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Sudden Oak Death Fungus

2012-Students


2012 Student projects

DSC09635_350Pierce College, Puyallup, independent studies

Temperature growth rates of Phytophthora and Pythium species isolated from western Washington streams.

Temperature effects on root infection of Noble and Fraser fir by Phytophthora species isolated from western Washington streams and soils.

Effects of gypsum on sporulation of Phytophthora species.

Biocontrol of Phytophthora using various bark mulch treatments.

Bellarmine HS, Tacoma WA, senior projects

Fungus death match! – Antagonism of Trichoderma spp. to selected Phytophthora spp.

Does exposure to cold increase severity of leaf blight caused by the fungus Phacidiopycnis washingtonensis on Pacific madrone (Arbutus menziesii)?

Dominican University of California, summer internship

A study of root infection of Viburnum by Phytophthora ramorum.

Washington State University, summer internship

Isolation and screening of biocontrol organisms found in Phytophthora-suppressive bark mulch substrates.

 

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated January 2, 2013

2015-Students


Plant Pathology projects 2015

These projects relate to the detection and management of Phytophthora, a waterborne plant pathogen. We will focus on P. ramorum, the cause of Sudden Oak Death (SOD), whose long-distance spread is primarily through trade in ornamental nursery crops. There is concern about the consequences of P. ramorum establishment in WA forests. This is a quarantine organism and the projects will be done in the biocontainment lab at WSU-Puyallup.

We are also interested in the oomycete communities present in surface water bodies. Organisms such as Phytophthora, Pythium, Saprolegnia, and Phytopythium are abundant in water but little is known about most of them.

Testing wetland plants for susceptibility to P. ramorumDSC05776

Constructed wetlands are being used to mitigate pollutants in agricultural runoff. These pollutants can include biological ones, such as plant pathogens. In this study we tested several wetland plants for susceptibility to P. ramorum to assess their usefulness in removing this organism from contaminated nursery runoff. Characters examined included symptom expression, asymptomatic infection, and inoculum production. Students from Pierce College did this project as an independent study class during the summer and generated some useful preliminary data.

Monitoring for invasive Phytophthora species in stormwater retention ponds

DSC05573In 2015 members of the Pierce College Biology 213 class sampled Bradley Lake at 3 different locations using various types of bait plants in order to look at the oomycete populations in the lake.

In addition to Bradley Lake, students from Puyallup High School sampled two stormwater retention ponds in newly landscaped housing developments in Puyallup, as well as two locations along Clarks Creek where stormwater drains. The goal is to identify Phytophthora species that may be moving from landscaped areas into the ponds. This will help us to determine which pathogens are present on the landscape plants and allow us to detect any invasive species early. In addition, baseline information about Phytophthoras and other oomycetes in these ponds was collected.

Stream monitoring for invasive Phytophthora species on the northern Olympic Peninsula, WA

The primary goal of the project is to expand the monitoring of streams in northern Olympic Peninsula region for P. ramorum. In spring 2013 a bait sample positive for P. ramorum was collected from the Dungeness River near Sequim, WA. A second positive bait sample from this site was collected in summer 2013. Further sampling of streams in the area has not yet provided information about the source of inoculum contaminating the Dungeness. Using volunteers, this project will increase the level of monitoring activity in a high risk watershed where the pathogen is exposed to native vegetation beyond what is currently possible to accomplish by state and federal agencies, and also provide an excellent opportunity to increase public awareness about invasive plant pathogens such as P. ramorum. In addition, some baseline information about Phytophthoras in these streams will be collected and streams where P. ramorum is not detected could be verified “free” of P. ramorum.

This project is completed and no P. ramorum was found. Thanks to Nichole Engel, UW Tacoma, and other students for help with processing these samples in the lab.

 

For more information or to volunteer contact Marianne Elliott (melliott2@wsu.edu)

 

 

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated March 10, 2015

2011-Students


2011 Student projects

1103_DSC07366_350Green River Community College independent studies

Screening a collection of Trichoderma spp. for antagonism to Phytophthora ramorum.

Pierce College, Puyallup, Biology 213

Stream sampling using “bait in a bottle” method at Clarks Creek

The “shoe experiment” year 2

Bellarmine HS, Tacoma WA, senior projects

Testing isolates of Phytophthora and Pythium for pathogenicity to Noble fir roots

Survival of P. ramorum in water from various streams in western WA

 

 

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated January 2, 2013

2010-Students


2010 Student projects

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated January 2, 2013

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Students


Students

We have a number of opportunities for local high school and college students to work on research projects involving sudden oak death and other plant pathology related topics.

For information about these projects, contact Marianne Elliott.

Student projects and activities

2017

2016, 2015, 2012, 2011,2010

Shoe1_DSC07402_350

Also check out:

Learn more about Phytophthora here

Data analysis and report writing basics

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated January 2, 2013

2015 Monitoring of stormwater ponds in Puyallup


Monitoring stormwater ponds in Puyallup

DSC05570

Click here to see the results of these projects

Oomycetes are fungus-like organisms found in marine, freshwater, and terrestrial environments. Some, such as Phytophthora, Pythium, and Saprolegnia, are parasites of plants and animals. DNA sequence data has revealed that these organisms are not fungi, but are more closely related to brown algae and diatoms. We will be “fishing” for these organisms by using baits form various plant species.

Ornamental plant nurseries have historically been a source of invasive plant diseases since they acquire plant material from many different sources and disease symptoms can be difficult to recognize on some hosts. like disease epidemics in the human population, once the disease moves onto a plant host with high susceptibility it can be very devastating. Phytophthora pathogens are the cause of some of the most destructive plant disease outbreaks, such as Sudden Oak Death, caused by P. ramorum.

This project, we will sample stormwater retention ponds in newly landscaped housing developments in Puyallup. The goal is to identify Phytophthora species that may be moving from landscaped areas into the ponds. This will help us to determine which pathogens are present on the landscape plants and allow us to detect any invasive species early. In addition, some baseline information about Phytophthoras and other oomycetes in the these ponds will be collected.

We are looking for someone who is interested in getting experience working in a laboratory. Volunteers and students with an interest in environmental microbiology and/or plant pathology would benefit from working on this project. In the lab at WSU Puyallup, symptomatic material from leaf samples will be cultured on selctive media. Colonies of P. ramorum and other Phytophthora species will be isolated and identified using morphological and molecular methods.

For more information or to volunteer contact Marianne Elliott.

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2015 Monitoring


Information for Master Gardeners


Water


Water management for native plant nurseries

Many growers use water from an adjacent stream or river for irrigation. It is wise to treat this water before use, to prevent infection of crops with P. ramorum and other waterborne diseases. SammR300
Irrigating restoration plantings using stream water is risky if the plants are hosts and the water is contaminated. This is critical for Phytophthora spp. that cause root disease, such as P. lateralis and P. cinnamomi. While P. ramorum is not known to cause root disease, it can colonize the roots asymptomatically. The consequences of this is an area of research that needs further study. DSC02178_3530
Sediment deposited on plants after flooding is one means of transmitting P. ramorum inoculum from water to foliage. 350_sedimented plants
A high water table will create a flooded situation in an in-ground planting, increasing plant stress and potential for Phytophthora infection.

 

Back to Best Management Practices for Native Plant Nurseries

350_high water table

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated January 2, 2013

Pots


Containers

Pots should not be in contact with the soil, as diseases can both leave and enter through drainage holes. Insulate pots from the soil surface using one or all of these methods:
Gravel
Weed cloth
PalletTray
300_ground covering 2
Fallen leaves and standing water + inoculum = Phytophthora infection 300_cans
Do not use dirty pots, they may contain inoculum. 300_dirty pots 2
If you re-use pots, be sure to clean residual soil and sanitize, using a dilute disinfectant solution, hot water, or steam.

 

 

Back to Best Management Practices for Native Plant Nurseries

300_Pot wash station

Contact: Gary Chastagner, 253-445-4528 | WSU Puyallup Research & Extension Center, 2606 West Pioneer, Puyallup, WA, 98371-4998 USA
Last updated January 2, 2013